Korean Student Association Taught People how to make Kimbap

IMG_2021By Pearl Mak

Kimbap Night, an evening in which the Korean Student Association teaches attendees how to make a traditional Korean meal, was held in Tawes Hall on April 14.

Kimbap is a dish made of ‘bap’ — or ‘rice in Korean — and other ingredients like eggs, beef, carrots, pickled radish, soy sauce or sesame oil — all rolled into a sheet of dried seaweed, or gim’ in Korean.

“I think it’s a good opportunity for like people to come out and just hang out before the finals to de-stress and everything,” said freshman Soobin Shin, whose major is undecided.

The event charged students $3 to make one kimbap roll, or $5 to make two.

Kimbap Night is an annual event held by KSA, said sophomore International Business and accounting major Hannah Kim, the club’s historian.

Ingredients were laid out on a long table, where students could then pick up their desired ingredients and head to a desk to sit down and roll up their own kimbap. Also featured were several YouTube video tutorials on how to make kimbap, along with club members helping themselves.

IMG_2022

“Last year, we were just basically selling them,” Kim said. “But this year, we’re kind of going for a different approach, where people can make their own.”

Kim, along with the KSA’s Director of Operations Gloria Lee, a junior and general biology major, agreed that the event was harder to organize this year because of this change.

“It’s a lot more people than I expected, actually,” Lee said. “It’s a little bit hectic because we could have organized it a little better, but overall, I’d say it’s a pretty good turnout.”

Kimbap Night was created as a fundraising opportunity and way for people to socialize, Kim said.

“I think kimbap is a very representative food of Korea and Korean culture,” Kim said. “When people learn how to make it, it’s something that they can take back to their dorm, they can cook it on their own and they can show their friends and family. I think it’s a really good way to share Korean culture.”

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